Professional Locksmith Points Out Dangers of New Key Copying Apps

You may want to think about changing your locks if you’ve left your keys with any strangers recently. One of the newest types of mobile applications becoming increasingly popular among homeowners and renters are key copying apps for ordering a new key. As if smartphones couldn’t handle enough sensitive information, they can now be used to precisely copy keys. One Greensboro-area professional locksmith is trying to warn people of the potential dangers of this convenient tool, according to the Greensboro Fox affiliate Myfox8.com.

“With these apps people don’t pay attention to it, I feel like that’s something they’re not going to realize is a risk that’s there,” said Jon Jeffries, president of Certified Locksmiths in Archdale and a former police officer.

You don’t have to be a professional locksmith to use it either. In fact, quite the opposite. The apps are incredibly simple to utilize as all you need to do is take a picture of the key, the app scans it in and in just a few days the new key arrives in the mail. About 59% of burglaries in 2013 were the result of forced entry and 63% take place during the day, but those numbers could change drastically if criminals start using this technology.

The local locksmith services business owner explained how easy it could now be for a potential criminal to gain access to your home. For example, let’s say you have to take your car in to get fixed at a mechanic shop. Obviously, you have to leave them your keys, and many times people keep their house and vehicle keys on a chain of some type. It would only take a few seconds to snap the picture needed and return your keys without the person ever knowing anything even happened.

The local locksmith services business owner explained how easy it could now be for a potential criminal to gain access to your home. For example, let’s say you have to take your car in to get fixed at a mechanic shop. Obviously, you have to leave them your keys, and many times people keep their house and vehicle keys on a chain of some type. It would only take a few seconds to snap the picture needed and return your keys without the person ever knowing anything even happened.

There were approximately 1.9 million burglaries in the United States in 2013, according to the latest FBI statistics. People like Jeffries could see that number rising and be especially concerning for women.

“For women it’s real scary — if you have a stalker situation then that person could get a key and you’d never know it,” Jeffries said.

Fortunately, for those willing to spend the money there are now high-quality locks which feature keys that cannot be copied by such apps. At least not yet. The app does allow you to pick up the key at a location. Jeffries says all professional locksmiths should ask for identification before handing out copies.

2017-04-25T06:24:12+00:00